Longtime resident dog finally adopted from Calgary Humane Society returned back to the shelter

WATCH: A Calgary dog whose adoption had more than 1.5 million views when it was posted online has now been returned to the Calgary Humane Society. As Global’s Tomasia DaSilva reports, the Humane Society is asking for kindness towards those who surrendered him.

A Calgary dog that took the online world by storm when video of his adoption was posted on social media has been returned to the Calgary Humane Society.

Moe, the society’s longest-term resident, was finally adopted earlier this month after 124 days at the shelter.

But the celebration was short-lived. Not long after, he was returned.

“This happens more often than people would think,” the humane society’s Phil Fulton said.

WATCH: Calgary Humane Society Pet of the Week: Moe

Fulton said the nine-year-old German shepherd cross simply wasn’t a match with his adopted family, adding the dog is too much of a leash puller.

Fulton said no one is to blame.

“We really want to encourage the community, especially on social media, to refrain from owner shaming or return surrendering,” Fulton said. “Let’s keep it about Moe.”

Some can’t help but be disappointed.

Humane society volunteer and Global Calgary employee Kris Webber has gotten to know Moe well, visiting him every Saturday at the shelter.

“Moe has been in the shelter for far too long. And he is one of the sweetest dogs I have ever had the pleasure of being around,” Webber said.

“It’s heartbreaking. It is. It’s absolutely heartbreaking.”

“It’s just like any other relationship. It’s all about fit, and if it’s not working out, it’s not working out.”

And Moe isn’t alone with it comes to not working out.

Calgary’s downturn has meant more animals being turned in and surrendered. Fulton said adoptions and donations are also harder to come by.


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Moe’s adoption fee has been reduced, but Fulton said there are other costs for adoptive pet parents to consider when bringing a dog, or any other pet, home.

“Because of his size you can expect to spend a fair amount on food,” Fulton said. “But the biggest cost is always going to be vet care.”

Fulton said that’s not optional.

“As an owner, you are obligated to pay for your pet if they require medical attention.”

Moe is not headed back to the shelter — instead, he’s off to a foster home for some training.

Fulton said he is confident the playful pup will find his forever family one day.

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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